Department of Psychology and Brain Science

People
Professor
Paul C. Quinn

Francis Alison Professor

Sc.B., Ph.D., Brown University

pquinn@psych.udel.edu

Office

230 Wolf Hall
Office Hours:
Tues. & Thurs. 1-2
(302) 831-1701
(302) 831-3645 Fax

Lab

418 Wolf Hall
(302) 831-6379

Paul C. Quinn

Perception, cognition, and development

My research is currently funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and centers on the origins and development of human visual cognition, in particular, how young infants represent information about people, places, and things. I seek explanations for infant performance that involve general mechanisms including a complex learning system and sufficiently sensitive perceptual systems. In this way, I attempt to avoid radical nativist solutions that rely on innate knowledge, although I recognize that there must be species-specific biological constraints of a general nature that make the development of visual cognition possible in what is a very short time. My empirical work is taking place on three different fronts: perceptual organization, object categorization, and spatial categorization. Current investigations examine the mechanisms by which infants organize elements to form perceptual wholes, group objects and people into category representations, and parse physical space into categories defined by the spatial relations of objects. I have become especially interested in how infants extract social category information from faces (e.g., gender, race, age) and how early perceptual biases for certain social categories might be related to subsequent social biases.

Professionally, I serve as Co-Editor for Developmental Science (2009-present). In addition, I am a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Experimental Child Psychology (1998-present), Infant Behavior & Development (1995-present), and Psychological Science (2002-present), and also serve on the editorial advisory board for Child Development Perspectives (2011-present). I have further served as Associate Editor for Child Development (2001-2007) and Developmental Science (1998-2009), on the editorial boards of Infancy (2007-2008, 2009-2013) and Developmental Psychology (1997-2004), and as a regular member of the Cognition and Perception Study Section with the Center for Scientific Review at the National Institutes of Health (2002-2006).

In 2013, I was selected as the recipient of the University of Delaware's Francis Alison Award: http://www.udel.edu/udaily/2014/jan/Alison_Lecture012414.html

Recent Publications

Hillairet de Boisferon, A., Uttley, L., Quinn, P. C., Lee, K., & Pascalis, O. (in press). Female face preference in 4-month-olds: The importance of hairline. Infant Behavior & Development.

Xiao, W. S., Fu, G., Quinn, P. C., Qin, J., Tanaka, J., Pascalis, O., & Lee, K. (in press). Individuation training with other-race faces reduces preschoolers’ implicit racial bias: A link between perceptual and social representation of faces in children. Developmental Science.

Quinn, P. C. (in press). What do infants know about cats, dogs, and people? Development of a “like-people” representation for nonhuman animals. In L. Esposito, L. Freund, J. Griffin, P. McCardle, & S. McCune (Eds.), Social neuroscience of human-animal interaction. Taylor & Francis: New York.

Quinn, P. C., & Bhatt, R. S. (in press). Development of perceptual organization in infancy. In J. Wagemans (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of perceptual organization. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Xiao, N. G., Quinn, P. C., Wheeler, A., Pascalis, O., & Lee, K. (2014). Natural, but not artificial, facial movements elicit the left visual field bias in infant face scanning. Neuropsychologica, 62, 175-183.

Hu, C., Wang, Q., Fu, G., Quinn, P. C., & Lee, K. (2014). Both children and adults scan faces of own and other races differently. Vision Research, 102, 1-10.

Xiao, N. G., Perrotta, S., Quinn, P. C., Wang, Z., Sun, Y.-H. P., & Lee, K. (2014). On the facilitative effects of face motion on face recognition and its development. Frontiers in Psychology, 5. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00633

Pascalis, O., Loevenbruck, H., Quinn, P. C., Kandel, S., Tanaka, J. W., & Lee, K. (2014). On the linkage between face processing, language processing, and narrowing during development. Child Development Perspectives, 8, 65-70.

Xiao, W. S., Fu, G., Quinn, P. C., Sun, Y-H., Xiao, N. G., Wang, Q., Chen, G., Pascalis, O., Damon, F., & Lee, K. (2014). The eye-size illusion: Psychophysical characteristics, generality, and relation to holistic processing. Perception, 43, 265-274.

Tanaka, J. W., Quinn, P. C., Xu, B., Maynard, K., Huxtable, N., Lee, K., & Pascalis, O. (2014). The effects of information type (features versus configuration) and location (eyes versus mouth) on the development of face perception. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 124, 36-49.

Xiao, W. S., Quinn, P. C., Pascalis, O., & Lee, K. (2014). Own- and other-race face scanning in infants: Implications for perceptual narrowing. Developmental Psychobiology (Special Issue on Perceptual Narrowing), 56, 262-273.

Yi, L., Feng, C., Quinn, P. C., Ding, H., Li, J., Liu, Y., & Lee, K. (2014). Do individuals with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder scan faces differently? A new multi-method look at an existing controversy. Autism Research, 7, 72-83.

Anzures, G., Kelly, D. J., Pascalis, O., Quinn, P. C., Slater, A. M., de Viviés, X., & Lee, K. (2014). Own- and other-race face identity recognition in children: The effects of pose and feature composition. Developmental Psychology, 50, 469-481. 

Quinn, P. C., & Liben, L. S. (2014). A sex difference in mental rotation in infants: Convergent evidence. Infancy, 19, 103-116

Dupierrix, E., Hillairet de Boisferon, A., Meary, D., Lee, K., Quinn, P. C., Di Giorgio, E., Simion, F., Tomonaga, M., & Pascalis, O. (2014). Preference for human eyes in human infants. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 123, 138-146.

Sun, Y-H., Quinn, P. C., Wang, Z., Shi, H., Zhong, M., Jin, H., Ge, L., Pascalis, O., Tanaka, J. W., & Lee, K. (2013). Face contour is crucial to the fat face illusion. Perception, 42, 488-494.

Anzures, G., Quinn, P. C., Pascalis, O., Slater, A. M., & Lee, K. (2013). Development of own-race biases. Visual Cognition (Special Issue on Face Recognition: Effects of Race, Gender, Age and Species), 21, 1165-1182.

Xiao, N., Quinn, P. C., Ge, L., & Lee, K. (2013). Elastic facial movement influences part-based but not holistic processing. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 39, 1457-1467.

Yi, L., Fan, Y., Quinn, P. C., Feng, C., Li, J., Guoquan, M., & Lee, K. (2013). Abnormality in face scanning by children with Autism Spectrum Disorder is limited to the eye region: Evidence from multi-method analyses of eye tracking data. Journal of Vision, 13(10):5, 1–13, http://www.journalofvision.org/content/13/10/5, doi:10.1167/13.10.5.

Anzures, G., Quinn, P. C., Pascalis, O., Slater, A. M., Tanaka, J. W., & Lee, K. (2013). Developmental origins of the other-race effect. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 22, 173-178.

Quinn, P. C., Tanaka, J. W., Lee, K., Pascalis, O., & Slater, A. M. (2013). Are faces special to infants? An investigation of configural and featural processing for the upper and lower regions of houses in 3- to 7-month-olds. Visual Cognition, 21, 23-37.

Quinn, P. C., Anzures, G., Lee, K., Pascalis, O., Slater, A., & Tanaka, J. W. (2013). On the developmental origins of differential responding to social category information. In M. R. Banaji & S. A. Gelman (Eds.), Navigating the social world: What infants, children, and other species can teach us (pp. 286-291). New York: Oxford University Press.

Liu, S., Anzures, G., Ge, L., Quinn, P. C., Pascalis, O., Slater, A. M., Tanaka, J. W., & Lee, K. (2013). Development of recognition of face parts from unfamiliar faces. Infant and Child Development, 22, 165-179.

Heron-Delaney, M., Quinn, P. C., Lee, K., Slater, A. M., & Pascalis, O. (2013). Nine-month-old infants prefer unattractive over attractive bodies. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 115, 30-41.

Uttley, L., Hillairet de Boisferon, A., Dupierrix, E., Lee, K., Quinn, P. C., Slater, A. M., & Pascalis, O. (2013). Six-month-old infants match other-race faces with a non-native language. International Journal of Behavioural Development (Special Issue on Development of Face Processing: New Evidence on Multi-Modal Contributions, Scanning, and Recognition), 37, 84-89.

Lee, K., Quinn, P. C., Pascalis, O., & Slater, A. (2013). Development of face-processing ability in childhood. In P. D. Zelazo (Ed.), Oxford handbook of developmental psychology: Vol. 1. Body and mind (pp. 338-370). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Quinn, P. C., & Bhatt, R. S. (2012). Grouping by form in young infants: Only relevant variability promotes perceptual learning. Perception, 41, 1468-1476.

Slater, A. M. & Quinn, P. C. (Eds.) (2012). Developmental psychology: Revisiting the classic studies. London: Sage.

Anzures, G., Wheeler, A., Quinn, P. C., Pascalis, O., Slater, A. M., Heron-Delaney, M., Tanaka, J. W., & Lee, K. (2012). Brief daily exposures to Asian females reverses perceptual narrowing for Asian faces in Caucasian infants. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 112, 484-495.

Fu, G., Hu, C. S., Wang, Q., Quinn, P. C., & Lee, K. (2012). Adults scan own- and other-race faces differently. PLoS ONE, 7(6): e37688. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0037688

Quinn, P. C. (2012). Evidence for mental subdivision of space by infants: 3- to 4-month-olds spontaneously bisect a small-scale area into left and right categories. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 19, 449-455.

Sun, Y-H., Ge., L., Quinn, P. C., Wang, Z., Xiao, N. G., Pascalis, O., Tanaka, J., & Lee, K. (2012). A new “fat face” illusion. Perception, 41, 117-120.

Quinn, P. C., & Bhatt, R. S. (2012). Gestalt psychology and the development of perceptual organization. In V. S. Ramachandran (Ed.), Encyclopedia of human behavior (2nd ed., Vol. 2, pp. 238-247). Oxford, UK: Elsevier.

Xiao, N., Quinn, P. C., Ge., L., & Lee, K. (2012). Rigid facial motion influences featural, but not holistic, face processing. Vision Research, 57, 26-34.

Kangas, A., Zieber, N., Hayden, A., Quinn, P. C., & Bhatt, R. S. (2011). Transfer of associative grouping to novel perceptual contexts in infancy. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 73, 2657-2667.

Quinn, P. C. (2011). Born to categorize. In U. Goswami (Ed.), Wiley-Blackwell handbook of childhood cognitive development, 2nd Edition (pp. 129-152). Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

Pascalis, O., de Vivies, X., Anzures, G., Quinn, P. C., Slater, A. M., Tanaka, J. W., & Lee, K. (2011). Development of face processing. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science, 2, 666-675.

Heron-Delaney, M., Anzures, G., Herbert, J. S., Quinn, P. C., Slater, A. M., Tanaka, J. W., Lee, K., & Pascalis, O. (2011). Perceptual training prevents the emergence of the other race effect during infancy. PLoS ONE, 6(5): e19858. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0019858

Anzures, G., Pascalis, O., Quinn, P. C., Slater, A. M., & Lee, K. (2011). Minimizing skin color differences does not eliminate the own-race recognition advantage in infants. Infancy, 16, 640-654.

Quinn, P. C., Anzures, G., Izard, C. E., Lee, K., Pascalis, O., Slater, A. M., & Tanaka, J. W. (2011). Looking across domains to understand infant representation of emotion. Emotion Review (Special Section on Infant Emotional Development), 3, 197-206.

Quinn, P. C., Doran, M. M., & Papafragou, A. (2011). Does changing the reference frame affect infant categorization of the spatial relation BETWEEN? Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 109, 109-122.

Lee, K., Anzures, G., Quinn, P. C., Pascalis, O., & Slater, A. (2011). Development of face processing expertise. In A. J. Calder, G. Rhodes, M. H. Johnson, & J. V. Haxby (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of face perception (pp. 753-778). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Bhatt, R. S., & Quinn, P. C. (2011). Different approaches to the study of early perceptual learning. Infancy, 16, 61-68.

Bhatt, R. S., & Quinn, P. C. (2011). How does learning impact development in infancy? The case of perceptual organization. Infancy, 16, 2-38

Liu, S., Quinn, P. C., Wheeler, A., Xiao, N., Ge, L., & Lee, K. (2011). Similarity and difference in the processing of same- and other-race faces as revealed by eye-tracking in 4- to 9-month-old infants. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 108, 180-189. 

Wheeler, A., Anzures, G., Quinn, P. C., Pascalis, O., Omrin, D. S., & Lee, K. (2011). Caucasian infants scan own- and other-race faces differently. PLoS ONE, 6(4): e18621. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0018621.

Quinn, P. C., Lee, K., Pascalis, O., & Slater, A. M. (2010). Perceptual development: Face perception. In E. B. Goldstein (Ed.), Encyclopedia of perception (pp. 742-745). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Slater, A. M., Riddell, P., Quinn, P. C., Pascalis, O., Lee, K., & Kelly, D. J. (2010). Visual perception. In T. D. Wachs & G. Bremner (Eds.), Blackwell handbook of infant development, 2nd Edition (pp. 40-80). Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishers.

Slater, A. M., Quinn, P. C., Kelly, D. J., Lee, K., Longmore, C. A., McDonald, P. R., & Pascalis, O. (2010). The shaping of the face space in early infancy: Becoming a native face processor. Child Development Perspectives, 4, 205-211.

Quinn, P. C., & Bhatt, R. S. (2010). Learning perceptual organization in infancy: The effect of simultaneous versus sequential variability experience. Perception, 39, 795-806.

Anzures, G., Quinn, P. C., Pascalis, O., Slater, A. M., & Lee, K. (2010). Categorization, categorical perception, and asymmetry in infants’ representation of face race. Developmental Science, 13, 553-564.

Quinn, P. C., Conforto, A., Lee, K., O’Toole, A. J., Pascalis, O., & Slater, A. M. (2010). Infant preference for women’s faces extends to girl prototype faces. Infant Behavior & Development, 33, 357-360.

Quinn, P. C., Doran, M. M., Reiss, J. E., & Hoffman, J. E. (2010). Neural markers of subordinate-level categorization in 6- to 7-month-old infants. Developmental Science, 13, 499-507.

Mareschal, D., Quinn, P. C., & Lea, S. E. G. (2010). Where do concepts come from? In D. Mareschal, P. C. Quinn, & S. E. G. Lea, (Eds.), The making of human concepts (pp. 3-9). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Mareschal, D., Quinn, P. C., & Lea, S. E. G. (2010). The making of human concepts: A final look. In D. Mareschal, P. C. Quinn, & S. E. G. Lea, (Eds.), The making of human concepts (pp. 387-394). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Quinn, P. C. (2010). The acquisition of expertise as a model for the growth of cognitive structure. In S. P. Johnson (Ed.), Neoconstructivism: The new science of cognitive development (pp. 252-273). Oxford University Press: New York.

Quinn, P. C., & Bhatt, R. S. (2009). Perceptual organization in infancy: Bottom-up and top-down influences. Optometry and Vision Science (Special Issue on Infant and Child Vision Research: Present Status and Future Directions), 86, 589-594. 

Quinn, P. C., Doran, M. M., Reiss, J. E., & Hoffman, J. E. (2009). Time course of visual attention in infant categorization of cats versus dogs: Evidence for a head bias as revealed through eye tracking. Child Development, 80, 151-161.

Hayden, A., Bhatt, R. S., & Quinn, P. C. (2009). Relations between uniform connectedness, luminance, and shape similarity as perceptual organizational cues in infancy. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 71, 52-63.

Kelly, D. J., Liu, S., Lee, K., Quinn, P. C., Pascalis, O., Slater, A. M., & Ge, L. (2009). Development of the other-race effect in infancy: Evidence towards universality? Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 104, 105-114.

Quinn, P. C., & Tanaka, J. W. (2009). Infants’ processing of featural and configural information in the upper and lower halves of the face. Infancy, 14, 474-487.

Quinn, P. C., & Bhatt, R. S. (2009). Transfer and scaffolding of perceptual grouping occurs across organizing principles in 3- to 7-month-old infants. Psychological Science, 20, 933-938.

Ge, L., Zhang, H., Wang, Z., Quinn, P. C., Pascalis, O., Kelly, D., Slater, A., Tian, J., & Lee, K. (2009). Two faces of the other-race effect: Recognition and categorization of Caucasian and Chinese faces. Perception, 38, 1199-1210.

Quinn, P. C., & Liben, L. S. (2008). A sex difference in mental rotation in young infants. Psychological Science, 19, 1067-1070.

Ge, L., Anzures, G., Wang, Z., Kelly, D. J., Pascalis, O., Quinn, P. C., Slater, A. M., Yang, Z., & Lee, K. (2008). An inner-face advantage in children’s recognition of familiar peers. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 101, 124-136.

Quinn, P. C., Bhatt, R. S., & Hayden, A. (2008). What goes with what? Development of perceptual grouping in infancy. In B. H. Ross (Ed.), Psychology of Learning and Motivation, Vol. 49 (pp. 105-146). San Diego: Elsevier.

Quinn, P. C., Kelly, D. J., Lee, K., Pascalis, O., & Slater, A. M. (2008). Preference for attractive faces in human infants extends beyond conspecifics. Developmental Science, 11, 76-83.

Quinn, P. C., Uttley, L., Lee, K., Gibson, A., Smith, M., Slater, A. M., & Pascalis, O. (2008). Infant preference for female faces occurs for same- but not other-race faces. Journal of Neuropsychology (Special Issue on Face Processing), 2, 15-26.

Quinn, P. C., Bhatt, R. S., & Hayden, A. (2008). Young infants readily use proximity to organize visual pattern information. Acta Psychologica, 127, 289-298.

Hayden, A., Bhatt, R. S., & Quinn, P. C. (2008). Perceptual organization based on illusory regions in infancy. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 15, 443-447.

Quinn, P. C. (2008). In defense of core competencies, quantitative change, and continuity. Child Development, 79, 1633-1638.

Quinn, P. C. (2008). On the semantics of infant categorization and why infants perceive horses as humans. [Commentary] Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 31, 724-726.

Izard, C. E., Quinn, P. C., & Most, S. B. (2007). Many ways to awareness: A developmental perspective on cognitive access. [Commentary] Behavioral & Brain Sciences, 30, 506-507.

Quinn, P. C., Lee, K., Pascalis, O., & Slater, A. M. (2007). In support of an expert-novice difference in the representation of humans versus non-human animals by infants: Generalization from persons to cats occurs only with upright whole images. Cognition, Brain, & Behavior (Special Issue on the Development of Categorization), 11, 679-694.

Kelly, D. J., Quinn, P. C., Slater, A. M., Lee, K., Ge, L., & Pascalis, O. (2007). The other-race effect develops during infancy: Evidence of perceptual narrowing. Psychological Science, 18, 1084-1089.

Quinn, P. C., & Tanaka, J. W. (2007). Early development of perceptual expertise: Within-basic-level categorization experience facilitates the formation of subordinate-level category representations in 6- to 7-month-old infants. Memory & Cognition, 35, 1422-1431.

Gerganov, A., Grinberg, M., Quinn, P. C., & Goldstone, R. L. (2007). Simulating conceptually-guided perceptual learning. In D. S. McNamara & J. G. Trafton (Eds.), Proceedings of the Twenty-ninth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 287-292). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Kelly, D. J., Liu, S., Ge, L., Quinn, P. C., Slater, A. M., Lee, K., Liu, Q., & Pascalis, O. (2007). Cross-race preferences for same-race faces extend beyond the African versus Caucasian contrast in 3-month-old infants. Infancy, 11, 87-95.

Quinn, P. C., & Intraub, H. (2007). Perceiving "outside the box" occurs early in development: Evidence for boundary extension in 3- to 7-month-old infants. Child Development, 78, 324-334.

Quinn, P. C. (2007). Categorization. In A. Slater & M. Lewis (Eds.), Introduction to infant development, 2nd Edition (pp. 119-136). Oxford University Press: Oxford, UK.

Quinn, P. C. (2007). On the infant’s prelinguistic conception of spatial relations: Three developmental trends and their implications for spatial language learning. In J. M. Plumert & J. P. Spencer (Eds.), The emerging spatial mind (pp. 117-141). Oxford University Press: New York.

Bhatt, R. S., Hayden, A., & Quinn, P. C. (2007). Perceptual organization based on common region in infancy. Infancy, 12, 147-168.

Quinn, P. C., Westerlund, A., & Nelson, C. A. (2006). Neural markers of categorization in 6-month-old infants. Psychological Science, 17, 59-66.

Quinn, P. C., Schyns, P. G., & Goldstone, R. L. (2006). The interplay between perceptual organization and categorization in the representation of complex visual patterns by young infants. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 95, 117-127.

Quinn, P. C., & Bhatt, R. S. (2006). Are some Gestalt principles deployed more readily than others during early development? The case of lightness versus form similarity. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 32, 1221-1230.

Quinn, P. C. (2006). On the emergence of perceptual organization and categorization in young infants: Roles for perceptual process and knowledge access. In L. Balter & C. Tamis-LeMonda (Eds.), Child psychology: A handbook of contemporary issues, 2nd Edition (pp. 109-131). Philadelphia: Psychology Press (Taylor & Francis).

Hayden, A., Bhatt, R. S., & Quinn, P. C. (2006). Infants' sensitivity to uniform connectedness as a cue for perceptual organization. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 13, 257-261.

Kelly, D. J., Quinn, P. C., Slater, A. M., Lee, K., Gibson, A., Smith, M., Ge, L., & Pascalis, O. (2005). FAST-TRACK REPORT: Three-month-olds, but not newborns, prefer own-race faces. Developmental Science, 8, F31-F36.

Quinn, P. C., & Bhatt, R. S. (2005). Good continuation affects discrimination of visual pattern information in young infants. Perception & Psychophysics, 67, 1171-1176.

Quinn, P. C., & Bhatt, R. S. (2005). Learning perceptual organization in infancy. Psychological Science, 16, 515-519.

Quinn, P. C. (2005). Young infants’ categorization of humans versus nonhuman animals: Roles for knowledge access and perceptual process. In L. Gershkoff-Stowe & D. Rakison, (Eds.), Building object categories in developmental time: 32nd Carnegie Mellon symposium on cognition (Vol. 32, pp. 107-130). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Quinn, P. C. (2005). Developmental constraints on the representation of spatial relation information: Evidence from preverbal infants. In L. Carlson & E. van der Zee (Eds.), Functional features in language and space: Insights from perception, categorization, and development (pp. 293-309). New York: Oxford University Press.

Quinn, P. C. (2005). Are torsos the basis for infants’ categorization of cats versus dogs? A reply to Vidic and Haaf (2004). The Psychological Record, 55, 663-667.

Quinn, P. C., & Oates, J. M. (2004). Early category representations and concepts. In J. M. Oates & A. Grayson (Ed.), Cognitive and language development in children
(pp. 21-60). Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishers.

Mermillod, M., French, R. M., Quinn, P. C., & Mareschal, D. (2004). The importance of long-term memory in infant perceptual categorization. In R. Alterman & D. Kirsh (Eds.), Proceedings of the 25th annual conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 804-809). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Quinn, P. C. (2004). Multiple sources of information and their integration, not dissociation, as an organizing framework for understanding infant concept formation. Developmental Science, 7, 511-513.

Quinn, P. C. (2004). Visual perception of orientation is categorical near vertical and continuous near horizontal. Perception, 33, 897-906.

Quinn, P. C. (2004). Spatial representation by young infants: Categorization of spatial relations or sensitivity to a crossing primitive? Memory & Cognition, 32, 852-861.

French, R. M., Mareschal, D., Mermillod, M., & Quinn, P. C. (2004). The role of bottom-up processing in perceptual categorization by 3- to 4-month-old infants: Simulations and data. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 133, 382-397.

Quinn, P. C. (2004). Development of subordinate-level categorization in 3- to 7-month-old infants. Child Development, 75, 886-899.

Representative Publications

Quinn, P. C., & Schyns, P. G. (2003). What goes up may come down: Perceptual process and knowledge access in the organization of complex visual patterns by young infants. Cognitive Science, 27, 923-935.

Quinn, P. C., Yahr, J., Kuhn, A., Slater, A. M., & Pascalis, O. (2002). Representation of the gender of human faces by infants: A preference for female. Perception, 31, 1109-1121.

Quinn, P. C., Bhatt, R. S., Brush, D., Grimes, A., & Sharpnack, H. (2002). Development of form similarity as a Gestalt grouping principle in infancy. Psychological Science, 13, 320-328.

Quinn, P. C. (2002). Category representation in infants. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 11, 66-70.

Mareschal, D., & Quinn, P. C. (2001). Categorization in infancy. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 5, 443-450.

Quinn, P. C., & Eimas, P. D. (2000). The emergence of category representations during infancy: Are separate perceptual and conceptual processes required? Journal of Cognition and Development, 1, 55-61.

Quinn, P. C., & Johnson, M. H. (1997). The emergence of perceptual category representations in young infants: A connectionist analysis. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 66, 236-263.

Quinn, P. C. (1994). The categorization of above and below spatial relations by young infants. Child Development, 65, 58-69.

Quinn, P. C., Eimas, P. D., & Rosenkrantz, S. L. (1993). Evidence for representations of perceptually similar natural categories by 3- and 4-month-old infants. Perception, 22, 463-475.

Quinn, P. C., Burke, S., & Rush, A. (1993). Part-whole perception in early infancy: Evidence for perceptual grouping produced by lightness similarity. Infant Behavior & Development, 16, 19-42.

  • Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences - University of Delaware
    108 Wolf Hall  •   Newark, DE 19716  •   USA
    Phone: 302-831-2271